Georg Ohm

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Georg Simon Ohm (16 March 1789– 06 July 1854) was a German physicist known for his statement of Ohm’s law (V=IR, voltage equals current times resistance) and its related forms. He was also credited with Ohm’s phase law in acoustics.

And he was a man of faith:

In 1849, Ohm published Beiträge zur Molecular-Physik, (in English: Molecular Physics). In the preface of this work he stated he hoped to write a second and third volume ‘and if God gives me length of days for it, a fourth.’ However, on finding that an original discovery recorded in it was being anticipated by a Swedish scientist he did not publish it, stating: ‘The episode has given a fresh and deep sense for my mind to the saying “Man proposes, and God disposes.” The project that gave the first impetus to my inquiry has been dissipated into mist, and a new one, undesigned by me, has been accomplished in its place.’ He died in Munich in 1854, and is buried in the Alter Südfriedhof. A collection of his family letters would be compiled in a German book, which shows that he used to sign some of his letters with the expression ‘Gott befohlen, G S Ohm,’ meaning ‘Commended to God.’ [1]

“The Renaissance Mathematicus” tells the story of Georg and his brother Martin:

This is the story of two brothers born into the working class in a small town in Germany in the late eighteenth century. Both of them were recognised as mathematically gifted whilst still teenagers and went on to study mathematics at university. The younger brother was diligent and studious and completed his doctorate in mathematics with a good grade. There followed a series of good teaching jobs before he obtained a lectureship at the then leading university of Berlin, ten years after graduating. In due course, there followed positions as associate and the full professor. As professor he contributed some small but important proofs to the maths cannon, graduated an impressive list of doctoral students and developed an interesting approach to maths textbooks. He became a respected and acknowledged member of the German mathematical community.

read on – it is worthwhile.

[1] “Georg Ohm.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web 16 March 2016.

Picture: Detail – The first record of Ohm’s law in Georg Simon Ohm’s lab book, today at the archives of the Deutsches Museum.

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